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quid
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Due to some discussion in another thread, I am starting a thread where collectors can show scans and discuss some of the inventive pip cards seen in playing cards.

I have to go through my collection, but will post something a bit later. Pip cards get a bad rap I think, but I've discovered some really lovely ones via playing cards.

quid
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These are my two Tarock decks which I include because one of the reasons I bought them was for the pips.

I am quite fascinated by renditions of the Clubs symbol. I always assumed that this trefoil was a shamrock, but one reference I saw said it was taken from the Rue plant, which grows all over Europe and particularly in Italy. This made sense to me, although I doubt historical documentation exists to explain the shape at all.

So when I scan, I always use clubs and a red suit for comparison. I love it when a designer plays around with suit symbols or indices on pips, and the Tarot Philatelique is a great example of this.

I'm also including card backs in scans because so many collectors find those interesting as well.


Attachment: TarockPips.jpg (Downloaded 92 times)

quid
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The Civil War deck is a facsimile deck. The gold is hard to show in scans, but it is gold foil rather than gold ink and some embossing is applied as well. Very handsome deck with old-fashioned square corners.

The Tudor Rose deck has a background of yellow with a faint striped pattern--also very handsome--seems very Regency or early Victorian to me.

Attachment: Pips2.jpg (Downloaded 90 times)

quid
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Backs of the above--sorry, forgot them the first time--very nice though aren't they?

Attachment: Pips2Backs.jpg (Downloaded 91 times)

quid
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Roman numerals on the Croisades cards--don't see that too often in pips. The facsimile decks show the stenciling technique which we are familiar with from Marseille and earlier decks.

Attachment: Pips3.jpg (Downloaded 90 times)

quid
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There are all kinds of ways to make pips interesting. The Louis XV ones have a gold ink border, but I particularly like the watermark of the crest on the backs of the cards being on the pale yellow background of the pips.

Claude Weisbuch--uttely charming--the hand of the artist.

Although I have many more playing cards, these are the only ones with pips that I have.

If other collectors have some interesting examples of pips and design from their collections, I would love to see them.

Attachment: Pips4.jpg (Downloaded 89 times)

debra
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The clubs symbol--that's interesting!  Here's something:

"Rue was once called the “Herb of Grace” and was included along with garlic in the “Vinegar of the Four Thieves” during the plague. Rue was once an officially recognized treatment for hypertension, diabetes, and allergic reactions. It's primary reputation is that of an ant-ispasmodic to smooth muscles. It is still a popular folk medicine in countries like Mexico, Lebanon, Iran, India and China. In traditional Chinese medicine, the leaves are applied to reduce inflammation from snakebites, insect bites, strain, and sprains. Used after Arnica has been tried. Not to be used during pregnancy, as it is uterine stimulant. It can cause contact dermatitis after handling the fresh plant." 

source: http://tinyurl.com/yp4a2p

More info and image at http://www.uni-graz.at/~katzer/engl/Ruta_gra.html




Attachment: rue leaf.jpg (Downloaded 87 times)

Last edited on Sat Jan 12th, 2008 06:03 pm by debra

quid
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Thanks Debra! I grow rue in my garden and have a little cup of it in a photo referenceI saved  to draw one day. One year I expect this glorious work will come to fruition. Sigh.

In the meantime, here's my particular photo from a summer long ago. When the handles crack or chips appear in mugs, I keep the ceramics for cuttings from the garden.

But you can clearly see why rue might be more practical as a source for the trefoil pattern. I can anyway.

Attachment: Rue_sm.jpg (Downloaded 83 times)

ahclem
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Pips! Yes!

These are from a deck called Rock Chaos Poch Honet. Interestingly, the number cards comprise ace, 7, 8, 9, and 13.

Attachment: hoch.jpg (Downloaded 82 times)

ahclem
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These are from the deck, Jam Session by Austrian artist Lisa Koschat. (This was the first deck issued in Piatnik's "New Talent Edition.")

Attachment: jamsession.jpg (Downloaded 80 times)

ahclem
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From Le Jeu de Marseille, the collaborative deck by surrealist artists organized by André Breton.

Attachment: marseille.jpg (Downloaded 77 times)

ahclem
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These are from Piatnik's reprint of the Arnold Shoenberg playing cards.

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quid
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Ahclem!!!!

These are from a deck called Rock Chaos Poch Honet. Interestingly, the number cards comprise ace, 7, 8, 9, and 13.

I would call those pips maybe a semi-transformation deck? Gorgeous--all of your examples are great.

Now, decks that only have 7,8,9, and 13 are for Piquet, Euchre, Bezique (with 2 decks of 32), and Skat. 32 cards although there might be different mixes of 32--can't remember.


Aren't they marvelous, these are very fine examples. The Jam Session one appeals to me as well.

victoria.star
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ahclem wrote: From Le Jeu de Marseille, the collaborative deck by surrealist artists organized by André Breton.Lovely!!
Thank you for sharing these photos!


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